Definitions of Success

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I’ve been thinking about the idea of ‘success’ lately in relation to dance. What it means to be successful, to find greatness and what that means for different people. This past weekend I went to Rock that Swing Festival in Munich and competing brought to light someĀ familiarĀ feelings and insights around competing that I thought I’d share. These are definitely coloured by my experience as a figure skater, solo dancer, jack and jill participant, partnered swing dancer, opera singer and burlesque performer. They are by no means groundbreaking, but might be helpful to someone else especially as people start preparing for London Swing Festival in May.

1. Define success before the competition. Why are you doing it? For the love of performing? For the thrill? To challenge your personal dancing? To place? Decide what success is before and then whatever the outcome take a moment to celebrate afterwards. You’ve worked hard.
2. Be kind to yourself. Unless it’s a showcase of some kind, you don’t get to pick the music, sometimes you don’t pick your partner or even the texture of the floor. The moment you walk on the dancefloor you’re winning – so don’t let other s#$% affect your state. Go back to what you defined as success. Sometimes it’s winning, sometimes it’s just sharing what you love with other people. If things go wrong, let them go. It’s just dancing! (I personally struggle with this, but you really do have to do it.)
3. Only wear things you’ve danced in before. This is something that I see far more in burlesque then lindy hop, but it still applies. Practice or social dance in the things you want to compete in. You’d marvel at how many things go flying or rip or tear when you haven’t tested them out. Wear that necklace or dress and make sure it’s not going to be more memorable then your performance.
4. Consistency is key. Practice your routine. Film yourself, watch the video and look for things to celebrate AND things to improve. Let yourself get comfortable with particular movements, tempos etc. It’s the easiest way to alleviate stress.
5. Look up. Maybe smile. Whether it’s burlesque, swing dance, cabaret – whatever – it’s about connection. Look up and connect with the people in the audience. Invite them in, make them a part of your success. They want you to do well and are on your side, let them give you energy. You’re in this together! That’s part of what makes dancing, performing and competing fun. If you lose this part it lacks the joy and life it deserves – that you deserve.

12 Months in Review

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1000+ – # of people Iā€™ve met in the last year from everywhere
60+ – # of hours Iā€™ve spent dancing since January w/ Swing Patrol
35+ – # shows I saw in London over 9 months
8 – # number of countries I visited (mostly in a 30 day period, oy vey)
5 – # of times I rehearsed my routine for LBF in Saul and Seleneā€™s living room
3 – # of bank accounts I have on two continents
2 – # of international cabaret festivals I debuted in
1 – # of hearts I got filled with love for you, my friends, my chosen family

The late night time zone-ignored phone calls, supportive photos, FB posts, quiet emails, coffee dates, posted valentines and innumerable hugs.

Friday, I graduate from my masters program (with distinction bitches!) and I am infinitely grateful. For my visionary parents, the chance to align with you, my wildly talented friends, and newfound room in my heart place. I didnā€™t know I could feel love like this. Thank you.